Monarch butterfly

Monarchs on the Move

The Safari West Monarch Butterfly Conservation Garden may be young but it has already become an amazing addition to our landscape and conservation work. When Safari West (with the invaluable help of Merle Reuser, our local monarch expert) first established the garden, our goal was simple. We wanted to help these beautiful and important insects […]

Invasive plants and species

Conservation Corner: Invasion!

Killer bees. Kudzu. Glassy-winged sharpshooters. Zebra mussels. White-nose syndrome. Lionfish. Medusahead grass. This laundry-list of organisms is one small sample of a long and ever-growing compilation titled “invasive species”. It’s an ominous sounding term and for good reason. Invasive species can wreak havoc on an ecosystem, causing widespread disruption and even the extinction of other […]

Smoke at Safari West during the wildfires

Conservation Corner: Prescribed Burns

Safari West is home to nearly one hundred individual species, each one sporting its own unique set of adaptations. Our cheetahs depend on fleet-footed prey to survive and have adapted to this challenge by becoming the fastest runners alive. Likewise, our many flying birds have adapted to life in the air with rigid feathers, lightweight […]

Migrating wildebeest

Conservation Corner: Migration Matters

The goal of conservation is the preservation of wilderness at risk and almost, as a rule, this is achieved by conserving certain places and certain species. This system has worked beautifully with populations that don’t move around much but has largely failed when it comes to protecting migrants. Put simply, migratory populations are those that […]

Monarchs in Mexico

Conservation Corner: Life Finds a Way

The monarch butterfly is a delicate and ethereal seeming creature that nonetheless manages the longest and most grueling migration in the insect world. During the spring season, these famously beautiful orange and black Lepidoptera can be found throughout the lower 48 states and even as far north as southern Canada. Monarchs are vulnerable to cold […]